Lightening — You Don’t Mess with Mother Nature — Or So They Told Me

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Lightening — You Don’t Mess with Mother Nature — Or So They Told Me

 

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Years ago as a child I used to sit on top of a pile of lumber at Dion’s Lumber yard next door and watch what everyone called “heat lightening”. I don’t see it anymore and wonder why, and then I learned that there is really no such thing as “heat lightning.”  What we were actually seeing was flashes of light reflecting off of clouds from lightning in a distant thunderstorm.

In my home when lightening was heard overhead things shut down in the house. We had to turn off the television and close the venetian blinds so the lightening would not wrap itself around them. To those that thought the latter was an old wives tale– it wasn’t. I saw it happen many times. So, we were all told to sit still in a chair with very little physical movement like the 2013 film Don’t Move. I was sure that if the lightening hit it would accidentally unleash a demonic force that might rip our family apart. So my mother rattled the piano keys at thunderous levels playing Glenn Miller songs while the storm raged on.

Meanwhile down the street some of my friends were not allowed to wash dishes or take a bath because lightning could travel through your pipes, and using any part of your home’s plumbing was a risk during an electrical storm. Fireballs had been seen flying out of faucets, and you didn’t dare get near electrical outlets. My Mother sometimes used to open all the doors and windows to let the thunder ball out if it so decided to go down the chimney. Her cousin had been struck by lightening, so I suppose she held that fear all that time.

If you were in the basement during a storm you better not be barefoot according to my Grandmother or you would get shocked. It was due to some story about our Cowansville, Quebec water reservoir being built over an active spring. I held whatever I needed to hold until after the storm as the lightening was supposed to come and rise up through the toilet and tickle your backside, or something like that. Take off any clothes that had zippers because the metal attracted lightning and hiding under your bed should be a last resort, as box springs were metal. It’s a wonder we weren’t all on “happy drugs”!

Talking on the phone was a no no as lightening travelled down the wires and the crackles on the phone line could make you deaf. One storm had supposedly fried all the phones on South Street, but no one had ever admitted their phone had been totalled, but  the local folks still believed it.

Hanging out at the park was forbidden during a storm as you were made to get out of the pool instantly if anyone heard a rumble. Of course the person that began this rumour was the same lady that told me I couldn’t go swimming after eating because I would get cramps and drown. That lifeguard had heard that little bit of advice from our Mothers that brought us there, and she didn’t want to get in trouble with them. I never did go to a funeral that someone got zapped in the pool or died right after swimming, and neither did my friends.

My Mother used to tell me that her Mother used to draw the sign of the cross on the window glass and mirrors in the house, and also on her forehead, to prevent the strike of lightning. All I could think of was that she was mixing up religion with lightening rods, and I still say a church that has a lightening rod is truly a lack of confidence.

The odds of being struck by lightning in your lifetime are 1 in 12,000,  but scientists say climate change may increase the chances to about 1 in 8,000 by year 2100. That’s fine I won’t be alive by then, but I do ask that others make the right decision about not getting struck by lightening. Could all those Mothers and Grandmothers be completely wrong with their stories? Remember, the road of life is paved with a lot of flat squirrels that couldn’t make a decision.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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