What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

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What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

 

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

Maple Leaf Dairy -249 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Joann Voyce added When this picture was taken this was Langtry’s Dairy/ The building to the right was the Beer Store

 

Jayne Graham Best ice cream cones..

Dawn Jones Fred Veenstra. Such a nice man. Always so helpful.

Angie MacDonald Cromlich Fred was a nice fella. I looked very forward to stopping by, whether it be with mom, my grandma, or running over from my aunt and uncle’s house that was across the street – I would walk in with a couple quarters and walk out with a bag full of penny candies. He was also open Christmas Day. Our family tradition was sharing scratch tickets….. The adults would have us kids running back and forth to buy more scratch tickets with our “winnings”. Ron MacDonald

Jo-Anne Drader Nelson On a Friday night all the kids in town would be on a mission. It was movie night at the Townhall. First stop was The Dairy. Kids would be lined out the door. We would all take turns choosing our penny candies from behind the counter. Fred would put them in small paper bags. You could get a lot of candy for a few cents back then.

Sandy Hudson Had many an ice cream from there!

Beth Sweeney I worked at the Maple Leaf Dairy when I was a very young teen (50 cents/hr) scooping icecream, making milkshakes. I don’t consume either of these to this day. Too exhausting selling so many for so long! Fun times tho! Bill Rintoul was the owner way back then. He kept alot of us neighbourhood kids employed over the years. Good memories.

Rick Redmond I remember a couple of the girls that worked there. From scooping ice cream, over time, their right arms got very strong, and they could beat a lot of guys at arm wrestling.

milk12

Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Mary Jane Lancaster When I was about 6 I was sent to the Dairy for my Mom’s smokes but mom forgot to give me my 10 cents for mixed up candy.
I took a chocolate bar.
When I left Fred called my Mom and told her what I did.
I ate the chocolate bar quickly on the way home.
When I got in the house Mom looked at me and marched me right back to the store
Fred met us at the door with a mop.
I mopped the whole store. When I was finished Fred said “there we are even “
I learned my lesson .
You have to earn
Your chocolates.
I never took anything without paying since☺
Thanks Fred!

 

Debbie Lynch My son took a couples if tomatoes out of a garden I made him take his money over to pay for it….don’t think he took anything that didn’t belong to him

Toby Randell Likely was there everyday from the age of 6 to 14. Penny candies, ice cream, video game rentals, movie rentals. Fred was a great guy!

Sarah Russo We would visit my grandma every Friday night and on the way we’d stop at The dairy to buy a bag of chips and a drink to take with us. I looked forward to it each time ☺️ Fred was always so friendly 😄

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Paul Bergsma I used to live down William St. RIP Fred. What a cool place to go to rent Nintendo games and grab a Coke out of the old fridge.

Gail Grabe I worked there for 2 summers in High School scooping ice cream, on the weekends people would be lined up out the door. A nickel for one scoop and a dime for two. Frank McCutcheon was the owner and I was paid $.35/hr. Farmers would bring in milk cans, it was pasteurized and bottled in the facility on the side.

 

Wendy LeBlanc I have so many memories of ‘The Dairy’ as we kids of the 1950s called it; it was around the corner from our home on James Street and we either shopped there or at least walked by it every day. The following are some random memories as they come to me:

When Dad first came home from WWII, he didn’t go immediately to the promised job at Findlay’s Foundry, but worked delivering milk for the dairy for some months. Our milk was delivered daily from The Dairy, but occasionally Mum would send us over to buy a quart of milk; I clearly remember carrying the empty glass bottle with 2 dimes and a penny in it to buy the milk, which at that time was not homogenized. Mum either poured the cream off the top for another use or vigourously shook it to give us wonderfully rich whole milk.

On Sundays following attending Church at Memorial Park United, we stopped off at The Dairy to buy a brick of Neapolitan ice cream, our staple dessert on Sunday noon. Very occasionally, we would walk over to The Dairy with a bowl and come home with it full of scoops of dipped ice cream for a special treat (we had only an icebox, so couldn’t store ice cream).

In the 1960s, my sister Kathryn worked at The Dairy and brother Wayne and I expected extra large ice cream cones from her, and I am sure she gave them to us in fear – not of losing her job, but of us. Peggy Mace and I stopped at The Dairy almost daily on our way back to school after lunch to buy penny candy; Mrs. Saunders was working there and was very patient with us as we carefully and slowly selected our treats. While we were there, a well-dressed man (I think I know who it was but hesitate to say as I am not certain – but definitely a town business man) came into The Dairy every day and drank down a glass of Alka Seltzer; now that must have been some kind of a lunch he went home to! Our childhood neighbourhood territory was small, but our lives were enriched with businesses like The Dairy and the people who owned and worked there.

Dale Costello Great memories, and stories of Maple Leaf Dairy. We were big time in CP with two dairies. Many a chocolate shake hand made by Ray Morrels mom. My Uncle, Lorne Aitken delivered bottled milk, and I helped on Saturdays.

 

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Sandra Dakers An awesome place for penny candy!

Cathy Paterson We used to go there as kids

Dale Costello Choices. Dairy on one corner, and the beer store on the other.

Pam McCauley A regular ‘go to’ place for my family – for years and years and years

Patti Antle Schopp Worked there for a year.

Karen Lloyd We had tokens that were left in the top of the bottles, for payment, no money was used, Rintouls owned it as I remember .

Julie Aldham I worked there…. Scooping ice cream

Sherri Iona My Nana would send us down to get milk and give us a quarter to get candy, a drink or popsicle. I remember the fake candy cigarettes! Plus I remember have shakes and the floats.

Bill Brunton Ice Cream Cones and those Candies. I also remember getting sent down to the Dairy from where we Lived on Moffatt Street for Smokes. That was a big part of that side of Town for a long time.

Sherri Iona Ah yes ice cream. I remember having first creamsicle flavour there!

Bill Brunton Licorice and those little red cinnamon things. It would be cool to see a picture of the inside of that place around 1975. Bubble gum newspaper’s and magazines. It was a cool store.

Jim GordonOne of my fondest memories of the Dairy was in the summer with the upstairs windows open ( where the Langtrys lived) listening to Ralph playing the piano. Also to Ray Paqette, yes, Wayne did deliver for them, and back then he wasn’t “ wandering Wayne

 

dairy

Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Ray Paquette Didn’t Wandering Wayne deliver milk for the Langtrys when they owned the dairy?

Joan Stoddart He might have worked there but he helped my dad deliever for the Carleton Place Dairy in the 50’s


Norma Jackson I loved their tiger tail ice cream cones, liquorice and orange

 

Kimberly Townend-willetts I used to love those, some people think I’m strange when I describe that icecream, doesn’t sound appealing to them at all….lol

 

Glenda Mahoney My Dad always bought his on line lottery fron Fred. Fred faithfully ran my Dad’s numbers every Wednesday and Saturday. About 2 months after my Dad passed I went into the dairy and Fred asked me about my Dad’s tickets. We had completely forgotten about it. Fred was still running the tickets waiting to hear from us. Between free tickets and little cash wins i think it was $24 I owed him. That was customer service.

 

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Photo from Google Image-Inside Ottawa Valley

 

Bernie Johnston Edwards I remember when one of the first game consoles (Nintendo Super I think) had a popular game come out around Christmas. Zelda I think was the name of it. Couldn’t find it anywhere in Ottawa. My friend’s son wanted one for Christmas. I walked into the Dairy and sure enough Fred had some. Made that young lads Christmas.

Hazel Stewart-Huneault Popsicles.. 5 cents
Believe it was the Rintouls back then or maybe the Veenstras.

Elizabeth Edwards My dad would take us and we would get giant licorice pieces for 25 cents each.
My friends and I once bought 800 gummy bears from him for 8 dollars so we could play *chubby bunny.
He sold “spice girl bubble gum” and when I was buying a couple pieces, he let me have the cardboard case. I thought he was the coolest.!

authorsnote)

TOP DEFINITION
Chubby Bunny
A game. Here’s how to play

1. Stuff some Marshmallows in your mouth.
2. Try to say “Chubby Bunny”

3. Repeat until you can not pronounce Chubby Bunny coherently.
Chubby Bunny


Jessica Racey Going in and taking forever to decide on what penny candies I wanted.

Katie Weaver loved going in there on a friday night after school and renting our VHS for the weekend and getting penny candies.

Barbara Plunkett Maple. Leaf. Diary. Was. A. Wonderful. Store


Wendy Healey Loved stopping at the Dairy for an ice cream when we took a trip into town. I remember the cement steps were so worn they had a curve in them. As soon as the door opened you were greeted with all sorts of candies on display. A treat for all kids back then.

Brian White the best milk shakes in town

Patricia M Mason Leduc 100% agreed

Donna Marie Cleary My first job was at the Maple Leaf Dairy in the early 80s.

Janice White Yep always loved going there for there penny candies. They used to deliver milk to the gate at my grandmas and went to pick it up for her and take it to her

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

4 responses »

  1. One of my fondest memories of the Dairy was in the summer with the upstairs windows open ( where the Langtry lived) listening to Ralph playing the piano. Also to Ray Pacqette, yes, Wayne did deliver for them, and back then he wasn’t “ wandering Wayne “

    Like

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