Glory Days of Almonte– Michael Doyle

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Glory Days of Almonte– Michael Doyle

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Photo-a snap of me and my siblings (L to R; Vincent, Mary Margaret, me, Maureen) taken in 1986 when we were all together for the last time (my brother has passed), on the bridge at the end of Carleton Street, leading to the Rosamond estate on the island.–Michael Doyle photo

Thanks to Michael Doyle for sending this. Please send in your memories and photos to me at sav_77@yahoo.com

 

By Michael Doyle

We lived in Montreal at the time. My father, Meyer Francis, was recruited in 1939 by Canadian Vickers in Montreal to work there as a pattern maker, a trade he learned while working at Findlay’s Foundry in Carleton Place. Our family joined him a year later (I was five).

My mother, Alma Veronica Voyce, came from Almonte and, our annual trek was to visit my grandparents in Almonte, then over to Carleton Place to visit friends and family, and then to Smiths Falls to visit my dad’s family. When I was a bit older, probably around 7 or 8, I was permitted to spend the summer months in Almonte, where I developed quite a few friendships. I cannot remember any of the names, but a group of boys would gather almost every day when weather permitted to swim, and a favorite spot was right next to the mill by the railroad bridge. The flume, a bypass of sorts to the falls, was a wonderful deep ‘pond’ and we took full advantage. The railroad bridge was, perhaps, 15 or 20 feet higher than the water in the flume and that was just too tempting to pass up. It was almost a rite of passage to say you had dove, or more likely, jumped into the flume. Summers at my grandmothers were really what memories are made of.

My grandparent’s home was on Carleton Street, at the time the last house before the mill on Rosamond St E. Their backyard faced what is now Coleman Island Park. That whole stretch of water from the old Almonte Flour Mill, to the falls behind the Rosamond Woolen Mill, was our summer playground. And we took advantage of every inch. We fished, swam, played daredevil and generally just had a wonderful time. Summer’s end was a sad time in having to return to what I viewed as dreary Montreal and back to school.

When I was a bit older I helped a local farmer out on Ottawa Street (at the time nothing but farms out there), to gather hay, for which I earned a few pennies, used to buy favors for a couple of young ladies I got to know, and in return I was taught how to kiss for the first time. Sweet memories.

That, and movies at the O’Brien Theater, ice cream cones at Petersons (two scoops), sodas at Sneddens (strawberry was the favorite), and the freedom to walk anywhere we wanted and explore the wonders of a delightful small town. If I recall, there was a pool hall kitty-corner from the O’Brien Theater, from which we were frequently ejected because we were too young. I remember the monument that stood on Bridge Street right by the railroad tracks, commemorating the awful 1942 Train Wreck.

I’ve attached a snap of me and my siblings (L to R; Vincent, Mary Margaret, me, Maureen) taken in 1986 when we were all together for the last time (my brother has passed), on the bridge at the end of Carleton Street, leading to the Rosamond estate on the island.

Michael Doyle
Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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Glory Days of Carleton Place-Jan McCarten Sansom– The Story of Petey Joe Kirkham

Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

Did you Know that Temperance Drinks Are all the Rage Now?

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Glory Days in Carleton Place- Tom Edwards– Horrick’s and Air Raid Sirens

Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

Glory Days in Carleton Place- Ray Paquette

Glory Days of Carleton Place–This and That–Ray Paquette

Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

 

Glory Days of Carleton Place-The Olde Barracks– Sharon Holtz– Part 2 

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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