May 8 1945 V. E. Day in Almonte – Photos

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May 8 1945 V. E. Day in Almonte – Photos

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VE-Day in Toronto

VE-Day celebrations, 8 May 1945

COURTESY OF CITY OF TORONTO ARCHIVES FONDS 1257, SERIES 1056, ITEM 195

 

Today Tuesday May 8 is VE Day-Victory in Europe — the official end of the fighting in Europe in the Second World War — was celebrated on 8 May 1945, after Germany’s unconditional surrender

Thanks to Sandy and Paul France we have these great photos of VE Day in Almonte

 

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“The day started when George Moreau came to the town hall, rang the fire siren and then announced to all that the war in Europe was over.
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The 3 people in the truck pic: centre Len Miller, right Des Miller (cousins of mine)
Multiple people in the truck: Howie Barr, Marguerite Wrigglesworth, Eleanor Wilson (cousin). Will try to identify others later if you like”
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Among the first Canadians to celebrate were the sailors on naval and merchant ships on the Atlantic, and soldiers and airmen based in Europe. Their long ordeal would soon be coming to an end, although many would still be tasked with providing security to occupied Germany, and bringing aid to the Netherlands, where the Dutch were desperate for emergency food and medical supplies distributed by Canadian forces. Across the Netherlands, Canadians were cheered and welcomed as heroes.

At home in Canada, massive crowds filled city streets. There were parades, band concerts, tickertape dropped from the sky by aircraft, and spontaneous singing, dancing and exuberance. Offices, stores and some factories closed for the day, while other factories remained open, churning out war material for the ongoing battles in the Pacific.

Canadian students also left their classrooms to take part in the festivities, or to attend special religious services of thanksgiving. In towns and cities and rural villages there were prayers and tears of relief, as well as music, happy shouting and, for the most part, good-natured partying.

“The silencing of the guns in Europe,” said The Globe and Mail, “brought release from bondage of the spirit.” The Canadian Encyclopedia

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Almonte Gazette 1945
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May 10 1945 Almonte Gazette
Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

 

Remembering Private Gordon Willard Stewart WW 2 Veteran

“Nanny Shail’s Nephew”– Gerald Whyte World War 2 Veteran

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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