Ramsay 1927 — The Depression

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Ramsay 1927 — The Depression

 

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The Depression raged from 1929-1939—the Ramsay farmers had enough food until help came, but things were tough.

Ross Craig– The Depression was bad enough, we were never hungry but things were tough. We had the farm– it was always something to fall back on.

Bert Young- Depression brought hard times especially with the prices of the farm produce. In 1931 our families income was $397 on which three people had to live. There was no money, but we were never hungry.

Mrs. J McPhail– Money was scarce and we had to survive on what we grew on the land. We learned to use everything and had no waste.

Jack Gleeson– As long has you had your two hands there would always be food on the table.

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Kellough– One Sunday we were without money for the church collection and before we went we searched the entire house from top to bottom for change. Under one of the rugs we found a dime which we proudly placed on the collection plate. It taught us that money was not and is not everything in this world.

Norman Paul– The Depression left a mark on me and everyone else that has gone through it. I now have a saving streak.

 

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With files from Ramsay Reflections 1979

By the 1920’s 90 per cent of the urban population was dependent on a wage or salary. Most families lived on the edge, relying on the often irregular employment of a male breadwinner. There was no welfare state to fall back on in tough economic times. A generation earlier, most of the population was rural and relied on their farm work for food and fuel. Living in the city meant reliance on a job to stay alive. To a large extent, the Elizabethan Poor Laws (of 1601) were still in effect in Ottawa. 

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 12 Nov 1927, Sat,
  3. Page 30 

    Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

    Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

    relatedreading.jpg

     

    The McArton’s of Ramsay

    Sutherland Genealogy– Ramsay Township Looking for GEORGINA

  4. Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell

  5. Ramsay Settlers 101

  6. What is the Biggest Change in Your Lifetime? Ramsay 1979

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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