Ramsay 1927 — The Depression

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Ramsay 1927 — The Depression

 

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The Depression raged from 1929-1939—the Ramsay farmers had enough food until help came, but things were tough.

Ross Craig– The Depression was bad enough, we were never hungry but things were tough. We had the farm– it was always something to fall back on.

Bert Young- Depression brought hard times especially with the prices of the farm produce. In 1931 our families income was $397 on which three people had to live. There was no money, but we were never hungry.

Mrs. J McPhail– Money was scarce and we had to survive on what we grew on the land. We learned to use everything and had no waste.

Jack Gleeson– As long has you had your two hands there would always be food on the table.

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Kellough– One Sunday we were without money for the church collection and before we went we searched the entire house from top to bottom for change. Under one of the rugs we found a dime which we proudly placed on the collection plate. It taught us that money was not and is not everything in this world.

Norman Paul– The Depression left a mark on me and everyone else that has gone through it. I now have a saving streak.

 

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With files from Ramsay Reflections 1979

By the 1920’s 90 per cent of the urban population was dependent on a wage or salary. Most families lived on the edge, relying on the often irregular employment of a male breadwinner. There was no welfare state to fall back on in tough economic times. A generation earlier, most of the population was rural and relied on their farm work for food and fuel. Living in the city meant reliance on a job to stay alive. To a large extent, the Elizabethan Poor Laws (of 1601) were still in effect in Ottawa. 

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 12 Nov 1927, Sat,
  3. Page 30 

    Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

    Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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    The McArton’s of Ramsay

    Sutherland Genealogy– Ramsay Township Looking for GEORGINA

  4. Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell

  5. Ramsay Settlers 101

  6. What is the Biggest Change in Your Lifetime? Ramsay 1979

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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