The Spirit of the 7th Line

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The Spirit of the 7th Line

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Photo Source below: Carleton Saga, by Harry and Olive Walker, page 507. Does anyone have a photograph of the original building? From Bytown.net

A landmark to the Church of Kirk of Beckwith that is no longer with us. The stone church called “The Church of the Cross Keys” was built in 1832, replacing a log church building. It served the first two Canadian generations of the first large settlement of Gaelic-speaking Scottish Highlanders in the district of Upper Canada north of the Rideau River.

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Joann Voyce sent us this newspaper photo–thanks Joann!

The 7th line is a dead end if you look at Google Maps. “They’d be walking to this church. They didn’t have horses back then,” said Reeve Richard Kidd. “They’d have to cross the Jock River and swamp and they had to do that in their bare feet because they would only have one pair of shoes.”

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The photo below is what the dead end of the 7th line looks like today. Kind of hard to imagine church folks walking that kind of mileage and in rough conditions, but they did. It was originally a log building centrally located on the 7th concession and there were separate entrances for men and women, but the building burnt and was replaced in 1832.

 

Below is what “The Church of the Cross Keys” looks like today. An enclosed cairn with a view of the remnants of a foundation of once what was. Scattered stones follow the lines of the foundation but part of the stone made its way to Franktown United Church for its construction.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Jun 1966, Sat,  Page 44

Today I stood there and became overwhelmed at once was and wished I could have spent one hour back in time. I wanted to meet the people that are now just spirits among the building ruins behind the cairn, which is all that remains behind the pioneer landmark that Reverend  Buchanan was never allowed to preach in. This is something every family in Lanark County should make sure their children see and remember the story.

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historicalnotes

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The Gnarled Beckwith Oak

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

What do you Know about the Prince of Wales Cairn?

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

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Know your ancestors thanks to Donna Mcfarlane

This is the Rev. James Carmichael who preached one of the last sermons at the old church on the Beckwith Township 7th line….mentioned in one of your articles– Have you read The Spirit of the 7th Line?

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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