Uncle Johnnie Erskine and Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

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Uncle Johnnie Erskine and Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards
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 Photo from Tom Edwards
Author’s Note:
I cannot do this without all of you. I try to document all your comments although it has been slow for me the past few weeks due to the heart attacks– but it’s getting there.:) But, any time you send me something or comment we are recording local history for all those generations to come. I am so honoured to share what you write and comment. Keep them coming.
This note from Tom Edwards made my day this week. Thank you Tom!
Hi Linda
Pretty cool to read and see the article you posted on my Uncle Johnny the other day. 
Johnny Erskine was married to Essie Rath. Johnny was my grandmothers brother on my dads side. My dad, John Edwards, was named after his uncle Johnny, and therefore, he was actually my great uncle. I can remember when people drove from far and wide, to get some of Uncle Johnny’s coleslaw at the IGA in Almonte. I can remember my dad taking the family to Almonte when I was a kid, to get groceries at the IGA, and moreso specifically for that coleslaw.
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Photo-Tom Edwards–My great aunt and uncle Johnny and Essie Erskine.

Sometimes if Johnny wasn’t too busy, he would flip my dad enough money to buy us a “Mellowroll” across the street from the IGA, at Petersons Ice Cream. The problem was Uncle Johnny was, shall we say thrifty lol, and he usually gave dad enough money to finance two cones, but there were three of us and it ended up being a nice gesture, but I can remember my dad laughing and saying that each time it would end up costing him money. 
 - Carleton Place Attract Crowd Harness Races of...
It was around 1982 that Uncle Johnny traded in his 1964 Pontiac Parisienne for a 1982 Pontiac Phoenix. I can remember him calling my mom, (my dad died in 1980), and speaking with her about how crazy the drivers were on Hwy 7. He had taken a drive to Perth with his new vehicle, and he drove 60. LOL His new car was in kilometers, lol not like the old Pontiac, and he just couldn’t believe all the cars that passed him and blew their horn at him. 
I have also attached a photo I took of the waiting station across from the store in Clayton. I noticed it last summer and took some photos of it to send to my brother and sister. I have enclosed my photo of it. Just for your information, my Uncle Johnny would be the citizen of the year, Connor Edwards, great, great uncle.
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Connor Edwards has been named the Carleton Place Citizen of the Year for 2016. On Friday, Dec. 2, Edwards was honoured for his contribution to the youth of the community, during the municipality’s annual appreciation night, which took place in the upper hall of the Neelin Street Community Centre. Bob and Joan Bennett, the recipients from last year, made the announcement in front of a capacity crowd. Pictured, from left: Joan, Edwards, Bob and Jan Ferguson, the Carleton Place Citizen of the Year for 2014. – Tara Gesner/Metroland
My great uncle Stweart Ferguson would be also an intriguing story. He used to have the stable on High Street at Mary and Glen Millers house across the road from Findlays. I was there many times as a kid. I can remember very well, the horse track they had on High Street out near Hwy 7, and also the track he used to run the horses on on the corner of Bridge and Townline, across from the Town View apartments.
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Photo from the Carleton Place Canadian files by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
I remember as a kid, going to his house on William Street, and him giving me half a dozen ribbons he had won at local fairs. His shed wall was covered with them. I would estimate that he had 3-400 ribbons. He had horses for as long as I can remember. He was also recognized by Rideau Carleton Raceway, and was awarded I believe it to be an Honorary Lifetime Member. 
 
Thank you again, for all your articles. It is a must read every day.
Sincerely,
Tom Edwards

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

historicalnotes
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More horse racing in Carleton Place and Carleton Place horses taken to Buckingham…Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 04 Jul 1963, Thu, Page 14
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Those horse shows in Carleton Place. Horse races at Lake Park and later on on High Street near Bennetts— click on the photo to read it all.. Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 11 Jun 1907, Tue, Page 6
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400 to watch Kart races on High Street.. Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 12 Aug 1960, Fri, Page 40 CLICK on photo to read
relatedreading

Wild Horses Could Not Drag Me Away

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

 

Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

Glory Days in Carleton Place- Ray Paquette

Glory Days of Carleton Place-The Olde Barracks– Sharon Holtz– Part 2 

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

4 responses »

  1. Hi Linda,
    I was reading your article about the young lady who drowned in Carleton Place a few years ago near the Hydro dam. Stew Ferguson was working for Hydro there and I know he received an award for helping to save the girl, either the first time or he second time. I’m not sure which time it was but I will try and find out. He also bartended at the Mississippi with Ted Smith in the early 70’s when Mrs Lemay owned it. My dad worked there part time with them.

    When I delivered my papers, I had some customers in the upstairs of the hotel. After I delivered them, I would go down to the dining room and see if he was working. Sometimes when he was, he would send me back to the dining room and Maggie Porteous/Ford, (not sure which last name), would lots of time either slip me a box of french fries, or a piece of cherry pie. Never had to pay for them, but she couldn’t always do it. I was empty handed if Mrs Lemay was in the dining room too. LOL. I remember Dee Dee Ford working there as well. I think Maggie was her mom.

    Liked by 1 person

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