Coleman Family History–Just for Your Records

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Coleman Family History–Just for Your Records

 

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Mill Street as it appeared in 1889. This land was first purchased by a Mr. Coleman from the Morphy family in 1820. In 1822, Hugh Boulton purchased it and finished construction. The mill was later owned by Horace Brown as a flour mill. On the left-hand side are buildings used for the Boulton-Brown Grist Mill, and on the right-hand side is the residence of Horace Brown, grandfather of A. Roy Brown.–Photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Read more at Down by the Old Mill Stream — Carleton Place

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 May 1942, Sat,  Page 22

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Mar 1947, Mon,  Page 8

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Darla Fisher Giles— D.C. Coleman lived in this house on William St. He is pictured here in front of his parents former house in 1924 during Home Week.

Robert Hawkins-Feduke– Again Linda, I thank you for keeping our local history alive and available to a new generation who may not be unaware of the people and events that shaped our community and indeed the country as a whole. When D’Alton Coleman was President and Chairman of the Board of the CPR, it was one of the largest employers in the country and one of the largest international transportation firms. He never forgot his childhood home and was always willing to meet railroaders from Carleton Place, should they be visiting Montreal.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

Read more about James Coleman and where he lived here.. CLICK

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to…

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

This photo of 283 William Street, Carleton Place, was taken in 1923. This was the childhood home of Dalton Corrie Coleman.
Coleman worked as private secretary to Senator George Cox in 1897 and as editor of the Belleville Intelligencer before joining the CPR in 1899. He advanced rapidly and before turning 40 was put in charge of CPR’s western lines.
In 1934 Coleman became Vice President of CPR, and, as the health of president Sir Edward Beatty deteriorated, increasingly took over his duties. Coleman was appointed president in 1942 and chairman in 1943. The company was then engaged not only in railway work but in war production, shipping and air traffic. Under Coleman, Canadian Pacific Airlines was organized.
He retired in 1947. Coleman Street in Carleton Place, site of our CPR railway station, was named in his honour. http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx…

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

12 responses »

  1. Again Linda, I thank you for keeping our local history alive and available to a new generation who may not be unaware of the people and events that shaped our community and indeed the country as a whole. When D’Alton Coleman was President and Chairman of the Board of the CPR, it was one of the largest employers in the country and one of the largest international transportation firms. He never forgot his childhood home and was always willing to meet railroaders from Carleton Place, should they be visiting Montreal.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Linda – I’m a great grandson of George T Coleman and great great nephew of Dalton. This is great! I’ve seen those two obits before, but I’m wondering if you have that picture of DC in front of his house in a resolution that would be big enough for me to print out a copy? I live in Ottawa and get out to CP once in a while. Rob

    Like

  3. Love learning about the Coleman family. Dalton Coleman is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Dalton’s grandfather William was the elder brother of my 3rd great-grandmother Melisha Coleman who married George Hurdis. Would love to know if the Coleman homestead on William Street is still standing or what the address would have been.

    Like

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