From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

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From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

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Earthquake monitoring began in Canada in the late 1800s. The first known, instrumentally detected earthquake in Canada was the March 23, 1897  in the Montreal-area event, recorded on a 3-component seismograph at McGill University in Montreal, Québec (QC). The first continuously operating seismographs in Canada were located in Toronto, Ontario (ON) (installed September, 1897) and Victoria, BC (starting September 3, 1898). These were low-gain Milne seismographs (most sensitive to large, distant earthquakes), which were a part of the global network established by the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

From January to June of 1897 various earthquakes were listed throughout our area.

June 4 1897-Almonte Gazette
A severe shock of earthquake was felt in Almonte about a quarter past
ten o’clock last Thursday night. Mr. D. M. Fraser held his watch in hand
and said the rumbling and shock lasted about 45 seconds.

About eleven o’clock a minor shock was felt. Several ladies who were attending
the theatres in Montreal fainted through fear and had to be carried
out. In Almonte dishes rattled, doors flew open, and many of our female
citizens were badly scared.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 May 1897, FriPage 1

 

 

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 10 Jul 1911, Mon, Page 3 What happened to a local Perth gal when she came back to Canada after the San Francisco earthquake.

January 13 1888

 

On Wednesday morning of this week, between three and four o’clock, two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt throughout Almonte, with an interval of a few seconds between each shock. The first was the more violent of the two* and lasted several minutes. It was sufficiently strong enough to vibrate buildings. Many of our townspeople felt the quake, and it caused many of them to quake also.

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 May 1897, FriPage 1

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal02 Jan 1897, SatPage 7

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Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune31 Mar 1897, WedPage 5

 

 

January 13 1888

 

On Wednesday morning of this week, between three and four o’clock, two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt throughout Almonte, with an interval of a few seconds between each shock. The first was the more violent of the two* and lasted several minutes. It was sufficiently strong enough to vibrate buildings. Many of our townspeople felt the quake, and it caused many of them to quake also.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Feb 1971, SatPage 22

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

 

 

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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