Remembering a Shoemaker in Lanark Village–Thomas Wilson

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Remembering a Shoemaker in Lanark Village–Thomas Wilson

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Throughout the county increased reliance on the market to provide goods and services encouraged growth in rural craft and retail activities. Essential to the rural economy, both retailers and craftsmen were widespread within and central to life in rural communities.

As many as forty or fifty per cent of households were supported by craft or trading activities and craftsmen such as carpenters, shoemakers and tailors comprised a significant proportion of village populations. Shops formed an important link to the world of goods, supplying a range of non-local wares to an ever more sophisticated set of consumers.

In memory of shoemaker Thomas Wilson from Lanark Village

 

February 28 1908– Almonte Gazette

Many Almonte friends heard with surprise arid sorrow of the tragically sudden death of Mr. Thomas Wilson, shoemaker, of Lanark Village, last Friday evening. Mr. Wilson, who was about 55 years of age, had been in his usual good health, had done a good day’s work, and was reading in his home in the evening. His daughter went to the kitchen a few minutes after seeing him reading, and stumbled over the prostrate body of her father, who had practically dropped dead while on his way to the kitchen for a drink.

The deep and general regret of the community was shown at the’ funeral on Tuesday,
the cortege being a long one. The A.O.U.W. and I.O .F . attended in a body, Mr. Wilson having been an enthusiastic member of both orders.He was genial, warm-hearted citizen, and his death creates quite a blank in the community in which he spent all his life. The widow and family have the general sympathy in their sudden bereavement 

 

historicalnotes

 

5832-82 (Lanark Co): Thomas WILSON, 29, shoe maker, Lanark, same, s/o Thomas & Agnes, married Mary Ann O’MARA, 30, Cumberland – Russell Co., Lanark, d/o John & Julia, witn: Duncan McLAREN of Lanark, 14 April 1882 at Lanark

Wilson Cemetery, by Jean Steel (doesn’t seem to be related to Thomas)

Situated on the East and West halves of lots 13 & 14 in the 12th concession of Lanark Township, there once stood the Wilson family burying site.  For many years, it deteriorated through neglect into a state of disrepair, and many of the fine old stones became flaked and broken.  In September 1972, the remaining nine stones were removed, restored and placed in the Robertson family cemetery, concession 1, lot 15, Ramsay Township, as many of the pioneers buried there were interrelated.

The earliest burial in the Wilson Cemetery seems to have been in 1869.  According to an obituary from the Almonte Gazette, Eliza Wilson, relative of the late John Kellough of Ramsay, who died in November, 1901, may have been the last body interred in that spot.

By the removal of the stones from Wilson’s to Robertson’s cemetery we see a fine example of family and interested friends co-operating in an effect to preserve a substantial portion of the history of the area.   Let us hope many more are motivated to follow their example.

Wilson Burial Site

Lot 13 & 14, Con 12, Lanark Township.

Burials – 1869 to 1889 CLICK HERE

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

Famous Local Shoemakers

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–Patrick Tucker, seated, with Mr. William.
Some twenty-five veterans of the Raids who had served with the Carleton Place company and still were residents of the town included Maurice Burke, John Burke, William Beck, John Cavers, William Glover, David Moffatt, James Munro, David McPherson, Patrick Tucker, William Pattie and William Patterson.After imprisonment, Tucker returned to Carleton Place and resumed his trade repairing and making shoes at his shop at the corner of Bridge and Franklin Streets.
He died June 12, 1905.

No. 5 Company (Carleton Place) 41st Brockville Battalion of Rifles:  From left to right: James Storey, William Dack, Donald Stewart, William Duff, Patrick Tucker.

No. 5 Company (Carleton Place) 41st Brockville Battalion of Rifles:
From left to right: James Storey, William Dack, Donald Stewart, William Duff, Patrick Tucker.


“The volunteers then marched up to the Victoria Square, where the Brigade was drawn up in square of close column and the proceedings and sentence of a Court Martial on Corporal Patrick Tucker of the Carleton Place (C.W.) Rifles were read by Assistant Adjutant General George Smith.  The offence proved in this case was gross insubordination. These Photos are courtesy of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Thanks Jennifer!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

 

What Does Regal Spell Backwards? Allan’s Shoe Store

Did The Bootleggers in Lanark County Wear Cow Shoes?

James Watson– Bigamy and Shoes

Lanark County Shoe Socials? A Past Fetish or Party Game?

Bristol Stomp Shoes by Charles Jay

These Boots Were Made for Walkin’ 1905

 

Manolo-in” and “Jimmy Choo-in” about Uncomfortable Shoes

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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