Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

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Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?


 

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I have posted these on the LCGS Facebook pages and do not want to lose them…

Ray Paquette’s Carleton Place Moment..-In the right corner of the advertisement for Howard McNeely’s Barber Shop, it mentions E. McNeely, Assistant. I wonder if that is Earl McNeely who later or perhaps prior to worked barbering with Howard Little and lived on Munro Street west of Rochester? As well, how many people remember Ned Root’s Shoe Repair beside the driveway for Stanzel’s Taxi?

 

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Ray Paquette on Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

What about the doughnut machine that could be viewed through the front window. It methodically churned out simple, unadorned fresh doughnuts that would melt in your mouth. My personal favourite though were the jam filled pastries. Woodcock’s was the last stop on my paper route and I rarely left the store empty handed!!!

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Linda Gallipeau-Johnston– Ned Root – oh yes – not only did we go there for shoe repair but he was just a door away on our street – Bob and Bill Root, the sons – Bob became a Minister and I have one of Bill’s DVD’s(singer).


Dale Costello-– Howard gave me many a haircut, and Ned Root performed magic on my shoes. Who remembers Mae Mulvey, Charlie Jay, Ruby McPherson at the Roxy, Kelly at the Chinese Laundry,Giffins restaurant next to the Roxy, E D Robertsons, Okilmans, Argue Hardware, and many more.



Linda Gallipeau-Johnston- Dale, I remember it all – free silverware on weekend nights at the Roxy – getting candy from Santa with the school – sitting waiting for your turn to go up onto the stage at the Roxy. I also I have a memory of a double deck bus(red) tour when I was about 4 – 1950 or 51? – it loaded at the corner of the town hall but we missed it. No one I know remembers this – Dale?? – anyone??

Allan Wing –George Eades at Eades Hardware, does anyone remember how to remember how to spell GEOGRAPHY . . . George Eades Old Goat Ran A Pig Home Yesterday


Dale Costello Remember going into Allens Shoe sore. If you spent more than $10 for a pair, you were getting expensive footware. And Abe Levine place, sold him lots of old newspapers, with rocks in the bottom to raise the weight. Bad Bad.

 

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April 26 2017– Memories of Ray Paquette
“The Mississippi Hotel was part of my paper route as well. What I remember on entering the lobby of the hotel was the number of stuffed birds and animals that adorned the walls. Frankly, as a 12 year old, I found it a bit “spooky”!”

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Blaine Cornell— I also remember the birds being in glass display cabinets. These may be the same displays that ended up in the waterworks building in riverside park. Where are they now?
Linda Gallipeau-Johnston- I so remember how dark it was at the front entrance – probably not so bad for those days – had to have been 50 or 51 – just a little kid but that memory sticks with me.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

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Related reading

The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

Signed Sealed and Delivered with Tom New — Ray Paquette

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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