McFarlanes –Stewart’s Fire– and Other Things in Ashton

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McFarlanes –Stewart’s Fire– and Other Things in Ashton

Donna McFarlane sent me this note yesterday:

“Sometime before 1874 the old log house across from the mill pub in Ashton was a hotel or stopping place operated by Donald McFarlane. I noticed that it was now restored to log.. Donald’s son William later opened a hotel at Youngs Point”.

So I am looking for information about the hotel. If anyone knows anything or has heard stories- leave comments, PM me, or send me an email sav_77@yahoo.com

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal15 Apr 1887, FriPage 3

 

Meanwhile I found this..

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In the old days the more outside buildings you owned around your home or farm- the more prosperous you were.  Or people thought you were. The complex at the old McFarlane farm in Ashton as it came to be known consisted of many log buildings scattered around the property.

The first building was a log shanty, and they threw it together quickly because they had too. Those buildings were the one with the large spaces between the logs that blew in the cold air in the winter. However, those shantys grew too small for growing families, so they were abandoned and usually a new frame house was built until the ultimate home could be achieved. That would be a stone home–meaning: they were now at the top of the heap in prosperity and social stature.

The McFarlane’s finally added a stone home to their complex and it had everything from the newel posts at the bottom of the stairs to the square fanlight and side lights. These were all the signatures of a master builder. But, it is the outbuildings that are a fascinating part of this farms history to me. Small medium and large log buildings frame the vista of meadows, flower and vegetable gardens making it a rich overall feel of rural contentment.

The Crown deeded the property to James McFarline in 1828. Similar to a lot of misspellings in those days his last name was later changed to McFarlane. When he died in 1867 the farm was given to his children and in 1891 his eldest son, James McFarlane was listed as the owner. James Lorne McFarlane was the last of the family dynasty to own the property obtaining the title in 1949.

In 1966 the McFarlane family ceased owning the property.

 

comments

Updates from Donna McFarlane– Thanks Donna!

The comments in the article above are not all accurate as the information was given by the owner at the time of the open house.
The farm lot 24 conc 10 was settled by James Mcfarlane in August of 1820
and settlement duties completed it was deeded in 1828. After his death
his youngest son James bought out his siblings (Catherine Drummond, Grace
Mccuan, Ann,Elizabeth,Janet, Martha and William) and retained this
property. James sr also owned Lot 23 conc 9 Beckwith which oldest son
William bought his siblings out and retained.
The log home was burnt and replaced by the stone home. The small two
storey log home that was used by the Mcfarlanes for a hen house was
actually moved by Lorne from lot 25 conc 10 (property that Lorne owned)
In Feb 7 1964 the properties were deeded to John Mcfarlane with Lorne and
Gladys having a life interest however because the farm could not support
two families John went to work off farm and it was sold.
Donald of Ashton and James of Beckwith and William of Goulbourn were
three brothers from Comrie Perthshire Scotland.

 

historicalnotes

 

Joseph Arthur Mcfarlane who was dean of medicine at
U of T was born on the Gordon Bourne property that his father Joseph son
of William of Goulbourn owned. He attended the Derry School.–Donna McFarlane
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Ashton Choir no idea of year–I’d say 50s??
Photos sent to me by Donna McFarlane

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal19 Feb 1897, FriPage 5

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal10 Mar 1945, SatPage 18

 

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Mary Jane was daughter of Donald of Ashton.. the other was granddaughter of James of Beckwith–Donna McFarlane

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal03 Jan 1929, ThuPage 22

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

Related reading:

 

The Ghost of the Lanark County Old Log Cabin

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

 

 

 

 

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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