What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

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What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

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Loggers at Innisville: Photo submitted to the Perth Courier 1984 by Mr. Crampton–Perth Remembered

 

 

Innisville had at one time two mills built by Abraham Code, George Code, and Thomas A. Code. Abraham Code who started his woollen mill in Innisville,  and was one of several entrepreneurs active in eastern Ontario’s woollen industry. He moved to Perth in 1876 and by 1883 he had acquired the old Kilpatrick tannery at Herriott and Wilson.

 

 

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                                                               Abraham Code

 

 

November 10 1872

Another fire in Ennisville (Innisville)

There is saying that “ misfortunes never come singly” and that is exemplified in the case of Mr. Code. It is only the other day since his grist mill was burned. Last Friday his woollen factory at Ennisville took fire and a good deal of damage was done.

At one time I believe no hopes were entertained of saving the place, and the machinery even was being removed. While on the subject of fires I cannot refrain from making a few observations which I think are called for.

Whenever a fire breaks out you are sure to see a few prominent individuals—men who ought to know better—rushing from one engine to the other frantically telling the parties in charge, what they ought to do. Sometimes half a dozen are buzzing round the captain of an engine, shouting as many different orders and thoroughly confusing every one. Now the best thing for these men to do is to hold their tongues and work on the brakes.

They know nothing about the working of an engine, and the proper parties to give orders are the Captains and other officers. In their proper places they might really be of some use but as every one could at the fire not one of these officious people ever put a finger to the brakes, although, frequently hands were scarce and the men thoroughly tired out. However, I suppose if any of them do see my preaching they will forget it ail by the next fire, so I will proceed to another subject.

 

 

 

historicalnotes

In an interesting pen picture of the many thriving woolen mills which dotted the Mississippi River from Innisville to Almonte in the 70’s and 80’s, J. Sid Annable draws attention to the fact that one of the pioneer industries was a blanket mill which operated above the bridge at Innisville by the late Abraham Code father of the late T.A. Code of Perth.

The initial purpose of this pioneer venture was the manufacture all wool blankets for the river travelers and shanty men on the upper Mississippi and its tributaries.  It was the largest industry in that district in the 60’s and 70’s and provided employment for many of the inhabitants.

Abraham Code was one of the leading figures in Lanark County.  He represented the county in the Ontario legislature.  After severing his connection with the industry some time in the 80’s he was appointed Inspector of Weights and Measures with headquarters in Ottawa.  He was a son of the late John Code who came to Canada from Ireland in the early ‘20’s of the last century and was one of the pioneer settlers of the Innisville district.

The Innisville blanket mill was destroyed by a fire in 1879 and in the following year Mr. Code moved to Carleton Place and commenced operation on the first steam mill on the Mississippi River at that point.  This old mill was constructed of stone and was five stories high, 70 feet wide, 100 feet long.  All of the looms and in fact all of the machinery was brought from Scotland as well as 20 families who were brought over to work in the mills and operate the complicated machinery.

Two years later, Mr. Code was obliged to sever his connection with the mill and it was taken over by W.W. Wylie of Almonte who continued the operation for many years.  Mr. Wylie took an active interest in the civic and military life of Carleton Place.  He was made captain and later colonel of the 41st Battalion of Volunteers and under him Capt. Joe McKay, Lt. Brown and Sgt. Jack Annable served.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal30 Jun 1937, WedPage 5

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Abraham Code

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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