Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 15oth– Part 1

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The Millstone has published its first instalment of 365 FACTS ABOUT MISSISSIPPI MILLS. It will be a series of posts for Canada’s 150th birthday this year — “365 Facts About Mississippi Mills.” So I thought I would begin to a few about Carleton Place.

The facts below are from the flyer passed out on January 1: Carleton Place-A Valley Town at Confederation 1867 by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. I have personally added some extra tidbits under the facts.

 

Fact-Most of the town’s building’s stood on the north side of the Mississippi River, with only about 12 houses on the south.-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

There seemed to be a continuous disagreement in this town over what side of the river things would be built. Case in point:

1879 – In continuance of prolonged controversy over the sites of the High School and Town Hall, the Town Hall on Edmund Street was converted in part into a public school, a step which brought a brief stage of physical violence followed by allegations of riot, assault and libel and a number of related court actions. The town hall settled into service as a combination Public School and village lock-up. Which currently houses The Victoria School Museum, now called The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

Read the rest here: The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

 

Fact-The Brockville and Ottawa Rail Company connected the village to Brockville, Smiths Falls, Perth and Almonte. The station stood at the east end of William Street.-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Carleton Place’s first train station was on Mullet Street, which was originally called Napoleon Street years ago. When Napoleon Lavalee bought land where Napoleon Street exists now- the street name changed to Mullet, and Napoleon moved to where it is currently located now, off of Lake Ave West. Lavalee’s white frame home still sits on the corner.

Read the rest here:The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Stay tuned for more.

 

 

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Carleton Place Celebrates Canada’s 150thThe committee is looking for your help! If you have any video footage from 1967 (that you are willing to share) of Carleton Place celebrations, we’d love to include them in our Video Footage Compilation!  For more information please call Jessica Smith (613)257-1704 or email jsmith@carletonplace.ca

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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