Looking for information on Joey Bond

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Two days I wrote about Joey Cram and former Carleton Place resident Karen Julian emailed me.

 

Hi Linda,

Isn’t Annie Joey Cram the same lady that had a store in Carleton Place? Her store was cluttered and her cash register was an old cigar box. I used to shop there all the time for yarn as she had a wonderful selection. I don’t remember what else she had in that cluttered store but she was such fun to talk too. Please let me know if I have the right Joey Cram – I don’t think there could have been two like her.


Karen Julian
Formerly of CP now in Straffordville ON

 

I asked Sandy Baird and she said no, that was Joey Bond. Her store was located just past the dry cleaners (Godfre’s) and before the lane way next to the hotel. Everyone wondered how she could find anything in her store.

She also didn’t recall anyone taking over from Joey Bond. Maybe briefly to get the stock down.  The building never burned down, and it is a wonder though it did not with all the stuff she had.

Sandie said had a brother nicknamed Bunny. She had heard his proper name once but cannot recall it. Bunny Bond dated forever into old age, with a local gal named Dorcus Bennett.  Dorcus was called Dick, had a twin sister, Martha Gertrude Groves who married Allan Groves.  Dorcus was Sandie’s father in law’s (Dr. Forbes Baird)assistant and after I tracked her down found out she made 600 bucks a year as an assistant in 1921.  She was also documented as being a volunteer for our local hospital board auxiliary.

The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum has nothing on her.. so I am looking for info.

comments

Tom–I remember Joey Bonds store very well. We were kids and went over there to get our firecrackers. She also sold us caps, and cap guns. She was never in the store and she was deaf. You had to ring the bell 10 times before she heard it, and you had to stand and write notes back and forth of what you wanted.

Valerie Edwards– Joey Bond was in the former Miss Hickson’s store when I was in school. Remember going there to get the gold & garnet ribbons we used to pin to our shoulder. She had an eclectic stock, sounds like what you listed for Miss Hickson, sort of. Things were piled all over. Beside her shop was Uncle Abe’s Barber Shop. He was a relative but have misplaced his last name in my memory. Remember the shop being piled high with all sorts & I think she still had the bell that rang when you opened the door. Uncle Abe’s barber shop was next door (taxi office there now).

Nancy Hudson–My mother was a dressmaker in Carleton Place in the 1950’s. I remember being sent to Joey Bond’s to get a spool of thread or ribbon ,etc. She was sure to have it if it could not be found else wear. Amazingly she could put her hand on whatever I was looking for among the clutter.. it had to be seen to be believed. I think her brother Bunny was a championship paddler with the Canoe Club in his youth.

Ted HurdisHahaha, I remember this well. We would go in to buy firecrackers and Joey would make us sign for them. She had a book or ledger and the names in it were hilarious. We would sign Dick Tracy, Robin Hood , you name it !

 

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November 1954

 

Ray Paquette Somehow I can’t see Chief Cornell prosecuting offenders who used the side of the street to let off firecrackers with the exception of incidents where the firecrackers were tossed at cars and the perpetrator was identified.

Bill Russell I know for a fact Elvis Presley also signed that little book…..

Tom–OMG Ted. I forgot about that, but that is hilarious. I do remember that book and some of the names in it. When Bruce and Dave and Bob all went in there after a game of road hockey in the post office yard, we would all get firecrackers and no one who wrote names in the book, were anywhere close to who we really were. I always had to take her a note from mom and dad, but usually one of the lads would write the note for me because I was younger than you guys. I can remember being in there with them, and we would stand there ringing the bell and waiting for her to hear it and have her finally come out of her back room to serve you. Then we would have to pass notes back and forth 10 times before we finally got what we wanted.

Ross Nichols–Around ’72 my parents would be concerned about Joie and when I as teenager I would check in her and report back to my parents (she would talk my ear off). In one month the store went from the old store to a very modern store (but the shelves were very sparse). One problem was she has lost the use of her legs, but she refused leave the store.

historicalnotes

Lloyd Hughes posted the following stores location on Bridge

H Bond barber

Mrs. H Bond Variety (formerly Mrs. Beach, formerly Miss Hickson)
Dorcas Bennett in the 1921 Census of Canada

Name: Dorcas Bennett
Gender: Female
Marital Status: Single
Age: 24
Birth Year: abt 1897
Birth Place: Ontario
Relation to Head of House: Daughter
Father’s name: John Bennett
Father Birth Place: Ontario
Mother’s name: Eliza Bennett
Mother Birth Place: Ontario
Racial or Tribal Origin: English
Province or Territory: Ontario
District: Lanark
District Number: 97
Sub-district: Carleton Place (Town)
Sub-District Number: 47
City, Town or Village: Town of Carleton Place
Street or Township: Herriott St
Municipality: Carleton Place
Occupation: Dentiste Arnd
Income: 600

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

6 responses »

  1. My mother was a dressmaker in Carleton Place in the 1950’s. I remember being sent to Joey Bond’s to get a spool of thread or ribbon ,etc. She was sure to have it if it could not be found else wear. Amazingly she could put her hand on whatever I was looking for among the clutter.. it had to be seen to be believed.

    I think her brother Bunny was a championship paddler with the Canoe Club in his youth.

    Like

  2. OMG Ted. I forgot about that, but that is hilarious. I do remember that book and some of the names in it. When Bruce and Dave and Bob all went in there after a game of road hockey in the post office yard, we would all get firecrackers and no one who wrote names in the book, were anywhere close to who we really were. I always had to take her a note from mom and dad, but usually one of the lads would write the note for me because I was younger than you guys. I can remember being in there with them, and we would stand there ringing the bell and waiting for her to hear it and have her finally come out of her back room to serve you. Then we would have to pass notes back and forth 10 times before we finally got what we wanted.

    Like

  3. Around ’72 my parents would be concerned about Joie and when I as teenager I would check in her and report back to my parents (she would talk my ear off). In one month the store went from the old store to a very modern store (but the shelfs were very sparse). One problem was she has lost the use of her legs, but she refused leave the store.

    Liked by 1 person

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