The Abandoned Appleton Mill

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Appletex Mill 2004-1.jpg

All Photos by Accidental Rob–Google Image

Years ago my son and his friends used to play paintball in this structure and it was filled with books. No lights-only daylight- and the place was quite eerie.

The 1980s were tough financial years for the Collie Woolen Mills. Supplies such as poly-cottons and acrylic yarns were hard to get and the economy was moving towards overseas labour and production. In 1987 the company went into receivership and the Ontario Development Corporation became the legal owner in April 1987.

In August 1987, under new owners, the mill reopened as a numbered company, 724597 Ontario Limited, and operated under the name ‘Appletex’. The mill continued to struggle financially. New investors came forward in 1989 injecting capital into the business however, in March 1992 all operations ceased and the premises were abandoned.

On Feb. 2, 2007, the Ontario fire marshal and the Lanark County OPP began to investigate a fire at the former Appletex property in Appleton, which resulted in the destruction of the former Collie Woolen Mill building.

Along with the 90-by 45-metre structure – which was fully engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived in the early afternoon – machinery and equipment stored inside were also lost.

Appletex Mill 2004-20.jpg

All Photos by Accidental Rob–Google Image

 

Appletex Mill 2004-6.jpg

All Photos by Accidental Rob–Google Image

 

Appletex Mill 2004-5.jpg

All Photos by Accidental Rob–Google Image

Appletex Mill 2004-4.jpg

All Photos by Accidental Rob–Google Image

 

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14089127_10154256216151886_8759342048529023111_n.jpgPhoto from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Charges laid in 2007 fire at Appleton mill

Dispute changes course as OPP make a move

Renfrew Mercury

First published on March 4, 2008.

The year-long mystery surrounding an incident in Appleton appears as though it could be unravelling, but at the same time it has created further controversy for another recent news story from nearby Carleton Place.

On Feb. 2, 2007, the Ontario fire marshal and the Lanark County OPP began to investigate a fire at the former Appletex property in Appleton, which resulted in the destruction of the former Collie Woolen Mill building.

Along with the 90-by 45-metre structure – which was fully engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived in the early afternoon – machinery and equipment stored inside were also lost.

The building is gone and it will be too costly to

Following the lengthy investigation, 67-year-old Balu Kuriya of Carleton Place has been charged with one count of obstructing justice in relation to the fire investigation and fraud over $5,000 in relation to the machinery and the structural materials that were in the building.

The current owner of the property is Carleton Place Mayor Paul Dulmage, who also owned the land and the building at the time of the fire.

In recent months, Kuriya and Dulmage made headlines in our sister publication, the Carleton Place Canadian, in another legal matter. Kuriya attempted to pursue criminal charges against the mayor citing verbal threats made over the telephone (allegedly left as a voicemail) and one face-to-face at the Appleton property.

Dulmage has consistently rejected any basis for Kuriya’s allegations of criminal behaviour, despite having also admitted to telling Kuriya, “You’re lucky you’re on this side of the ground.” He has denied that was a death threat, suggesting that it was merely a reference to Kuriya being in Canada, rather than this native India.

The comments were related to a dispute over the mill, which Kuriya claims contained property that belonged to him. A justice of the peace issued a summons against Dulmage last August after Kuriya accused Dulmage of uttering threats against him. Kuriya said he filed private criminal charges after the OPP showed no interest in pursuing his complaint.

Last week, it was reported that Kuriya wanted to continue to pursue criminal charges against Dulmage despite a judge’s refusal to approve the Kuriya’s charges against Dulmage.

Kuriya was arrested on Wednesday, Feb. 27 when he attended the Carleton Place OPP office. He was released from custody with conditions on a promise to appear.

He is scheduled to appear in Perth provincial court date on April 14.

“I really don’t know what to say about the whole thing,” Dulmage told the Gazette. “I had no insurance on the building or on its contents, so I’ll be going after his insurance company.”

About two months after the fire, a leaky oil tank on the property was discovered. Dulmage said that this, along with initial cleanup efforts from the fire, have already cost him $500,000, and all the necessary work has yet to be completed.

“It was a bad hit because I was going to turn the building into a seniors complex,” he said. “The building was there and it would have been easy to renovate it. Now

the building is gone and it will be too costly to replace it.”

Dulmage said that he plans to develop the property into a residential subdivision.

Lanark County Genealogical Society Website

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

Related reading

Unravelled: Appleton textile mill

Glen Isle and Appleton by Air-The Sky Pilots of Carleton Place

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

Appleton Before the Dam was Built

The Appleton General Store and Polly Parrot

The Insane Spinster Ghost of Appleton Ontario

The Apple Does Not Fall far from the Tree — Virtual Tour of a Teskey Home

The Unforgettable Day the Museum Burned Down

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

Before and After on Lake Ave West — H. D. Gilmour

The Appleton Chinchilla House

 

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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