Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place

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All Photos from the Museum of Science and Technology—except if noted

Hi Linda,
Many of these pictures were taken by Aubrey Mattingly. He was our uncle. His archive of 6,000+ photos and railway memorabilia extended recorded the history of the railways in the Ottawa Valley between 1928 and 1984. It is the most comprehensive local history of its kind and was accepted by the National Museum of Science & Tech. Many are scenes in and around Carleton Place because of our family connection. He inspired me to also be a railway fan.

 

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

 

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The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum actually has two photographs taken during the Royal Visit. The first photo is of the Carleton Place train station (where Tim Horton’s sits today) decorated for the Royal’s arrival on the 24th of September 1901. The second was taken the day before at Britannia Bay during the War Canoe Championships.

First picture– you are looking southwest towards the station. Houses in the background on Coleman Street are still standing today.

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo

 

Yesterday Scott Henderson found this photo on Twitter and it got me digging. Who knew  who knew Carleton Place had a Royal Visit? The Duke of York of course became King George of course.

So I went hunting and there are all sorts of photos from the Museum of Science and Technology site of our trains and train station.. Here are just a few.

 

Remember this sound? Play it while you look at the pictures…

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

 

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

 

MAT002124.jpgPhoto from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

 

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

 

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

 

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly
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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

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Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey MattinglyMAT003259.jpg

Photo from Museum of Science and Technology-Aubrey Mattingly

 

 

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Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

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A new photo popped up at Public Archives. Our first train station Carleton Place Junction 1892.

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

2 responses »

  1. Hi Linda,
    Many of these pictures were taken by Aubrey Mattingly. He was our uncle. His archive of 6,000+ photos and railway memorabilia extended recorded the history of the railways in the Ottawa Valley between 1928 and 1984. It is the most comprehensive local history of its kind and was accepted by the National Museum of Science & Tech. Many are scenes in and around Carleton Place because of our family connection. He inspired me to also be a railway fan.

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