Blast From the Past–Orange Parade Smiths Falls– Year Unknown

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This was taken in the 70s

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Photo from the Carleton  Place Canadian files- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Another parade in Smiths Falls we cannot document from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Photos of the Orange Parade Almonte 1963 — Name that Band?

And Then There Were 11– Orangemen’s Parade in Carleton Place

The Day 5000 People Marched Into Carleton Place – Controversial New Exhibit!

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

3 responses »

  1. I was probably in the parade in Smiths Falls since I was an active member of the ôrange Order at the time;the 1963 parade in Almonte was the first one I was in. Some of the information here doesn’t agree with my knowledge of the order’s history. I might note regarding the comments about Daniel Shipman in another post that he was a staunch Protestant and one of his descendants was Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario East in the late 1930s.

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  2. Many of the Rosamonds were Orangemen as well. The charter, or warrant, of Almonte LOL 378 was issued to James Rosamond as their first Worshipful Master. The Orange Hall was located at 151 Reserve Street at the corner of Albert Street, and was converted into apartments when the lodge was closed. I have often wondered if the workers doing the renovations removed the suspended ceiling in the upstairs lodge room, and what their reaction was if they did.

    The reason I say this is a family story I was told a few times. My grandfather, Robert Francis “Frank” Morrow and his twin brother William Clement “Bill” Morrow were both members of the Orange Order, but did not join or go through the degrees at the same time. Frank joined first in Carleton Place, after being turned down by the Almonte lodge because his step-father, Christopher “Christie” Blair was a member of Holy Name of Mary (then believed to be named St. Mary’s) Church. Uncle Bill joined sometime afterwards, so Frank was able to witness his twin’s progress through the degrees.

    Apparently, Uncle Bill was very high-strung and whether the members involved were aware of it or not I have no way of knowing 100 or more years later, but the night he was taking the Royal Arch (3rd) degree some of the members of the degree team were supposed to brush the backs of his bared legs (pant legs rolled up to the knees) with birch rods at 3 certain points in the ceremony; instead of using the birch rods called for in the ritual, they used Prickly Ash. Each time he was touched with the Prickly Ash he apparently sprang into the air, almost like a cat, hit the 18 foot high ceiling with his bare feet and landed back on the floor on his feet, after leaving footprints in the plaster ceiling all 3 times, and in different areas of the ceiling.

    Another story about Uncle Bill’s nervous condition does not involve the Orange Lodge, at least not directly. Uncle Bill was working at the Rosamond mill where the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum is located now. one of his co-workers came up behind him as the staff was preparing to leave the building for lunch and poked him in the ribs, saying “Get him, Billy”. Instead of hitting the intended target Uncle Bill reportedly spun around and decked the provoker, knocking him cold. This was witnessed by one of the supervisors, who promptly “pink slipped” the provoker.

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