Bristol Stomp Shoes by Charles Jay

Standard

 

13612359_10154119579646886_5491890376316347627_n.jpg

Charlie Jay Shoes was a fixture here and there on Bridge Street a long time ago and was once located where the Granary’s new expansion is now.

13631396_10154119596996886_998532725128170074_n.jpg

 

13620172_10154119580091886_2581277121914651907_n.jpg

This was what rent once was for his store.

45 dollars?

What a deal!

13606467_10154119580576886_2082977020688156993_n.jpg

 

John Edwards–Next door to Charlie Jay’s Shoe Repair store at this time was Milady Dress Shop,(Granary location) owned and operated by Eleanor Shane . Widowed in 1940 with three children she was refused social assistance. She eventually went on to sell Raleigh garments for women and earned the capital to set up her store. When my father had brain cancer in 1959 and 1960, I would go to Grandma Shane’s store from Central School (current Post Office) for lunch in order to give my mother some relief.
Every family has these stories of difficulties and endurance. Somehow we only remember the kindness.

Blaine Cornell-I remember Charley well. He used to also sharpen skates in his store. He had a habit of not repairing your shoes until the day you were expecting them to be ready. You would go to the store to get them, then wait while he repaired them. He was a talkitive character who always had few old timers sitting in the store whiling away their time.

Dale Costello-Dont know how many times I patronized Mr Jays shop. At least hundreds. Quality work and very reasonable. A magician with shoes. Some of my favourite haunts growing up in CP. Chips and shakes- Bellamys, work wear-Okilmans, bakery! Woodstock, best in Canada, candy -Mulvey. Shoe repair-Charlie Jay, dry cleaning- Charlie Godfrey, beer- The Queens hotel, just hanging out- Olympia, pool- until Cecils, produce-Argues, hockey-the arena, shoes- Stanzels, Saturday night parties- Ken Bennett’s, my fingers hurting, please add to the list.

Donna Mcfarlane-Charlie Jay used to have a general store at Blacks Corners kitty corner from the township offices.(.building was actually destroyed by fire in 1954) I have always felt guilty about owing him five cents..When i was about six a friends father stopped there on way home from sunday school.. Joan got a mcintosh toffee bar and told Charlie to charge it to her dad.. I decided to do the same.. but my dad did not have an account but Charlie gave it to me anyhow and I know he did not tell Dad or I would not have been able to sit down for a week. He had the best ice cream cones there I remember the triple dips for a dime..

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston-When we went to Central School we used to get old heels from shoes to use in hopscotch tournaments at Charlies for a nickel. Talk about recycling.

 

Advertisements

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

7 responses »

  1. I remember Charley well. He used to also sharpen skates in his store. He had a habit of not repairing your shoes until the day you were expecting them to be ready. You would go to the store to get them, then wait while he repaired them. He was a talkitive character who always had few old timers sitting in the store whiling away their time.

  2. Next door to Charlie Jay’s Shoe Repair store at this time was Milady Dress Shop,(Granary location) owned and operated by Eleanor Shane . Widowed in 1940 with three children she was refused social assistance. She eventually went on to sell Raleigh garments for women and earned the capital to set up her store. When my father had brain cancer in 1959 and 1960, I would go to Grandma Shane’s store from Central School (current Post Office) for lunch in order to give my mother some relief.

    Every family has these stories of difficulties and endurance. Somehow we only remember the kindness.

  3. Dale Costello mentioned the Mulvey’s, a small candy store beside Central School where Ike Smith’s Barbershop is currently. What I remember is the patience of Job shown by Mrs. Mulvey as we pondered what to buy with the nickel we had, not a small sum in my youth. Everything seemed to be “2 for a penny”, or “three for a penny” so the decisions made at Mulvey’s was often our first lesson in personal financial management. The right decision could fill the little paper bag that our purchases were stowed in!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s