The Church that Died

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FreaktographyPhotographer, Urban Explorer, Recreational Trespasser

 

A rarity among Ontario’s abandoned places are churches, Ontario’s back roads are full of vacant and abandoned homes and buildings, however churches are a rare find. Cities like Detroit, Buffalo and other U.S. cities offer a full range of abandonments, including churches from large cathedral like to smaller community churches.

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Located in a small town in Southern Ontario, many people have probably driven past this church and paid it no attention. The grounds seem to be maintained and there is a cemetery on the property, many of the graves with freshly laid flowers. The outside looks like most older rural churches and there are no real external signs of abandonment.

 

 

I walked the perimeter of this church looking for any signs of life or recent activity, no signs of activity could be found anywhere and it was quickly determined that this church was abandoned.

The interior smelled of dust and years of abandonment. Oddly, the inside looked almost as though the last service had taken place just last Sunday. All of the chairs were perfectly lined up inside, a pillow still sat on the front row pew and bibles still stacked on some chairs.

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The chairs, bibles and floors were coated with a thick layer of dust, the air inside was thick and old and there was a great deal of water damage and mold growing on the walls. Spider webs stretched from the walls onto the perfectly lined up chairs.

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At the front of the abandoned church sits the piano, silenced from years of vacancy and also coated with dust and topped off with a bouquet of artificial flowers.

Sitting, still opened to the last song played was the song book. “Songs from Testimony,” from which the last song to be played was “O How I Love Jesus” written and composed by Frederick Whitfield in 1855, 42 years before this church was opened.

“There is a Name I love to hear,
I love to sing its worth;
It sounds like music in my ear,
The sweetest Name on earth.”

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As I explored this small room, periodically interrupted by the pitter-patter of the raccoon’s now living in the ceiling, I found a number of very interesting items:

A stack of bibles across the front of the room, coated in dust and pigeon waste:

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The list of readings for the day of the last service:

“We Are a Separated People:

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Atop the alter at the head of the church sat the priests glasses along with a list of his notes for the day:

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Sitting on a wooden table behind the alter was a large heavy leather bound bible, worn and weathered from years upon years of use. With the church being over 100 years old, it’s a great thought that this bible may have been here since the churches opening day:

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Not wanting to overstay my welcome I grabbed a few more shots of the stained glass windows and of the cemetery outside. Since this visit, I have seen a few other small rural abandoned churches, but none with the atmosphere or quality of this one.

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For more from Freaktography Urban Exploration & Photography you can follow along on Facebook and you can also visit Freaktography.ca

More great abandoned photos BY Freaktography

 

Related reading:

Photographer Finds Money in a Local Abandoned Home

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

Burning Down the House — Literally in Lanark County

Investigating the Basement of the Carleton Place Canadian – If These Walls Could Talk

Channeling John Gillies

 

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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