The John Shore House

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Photo from Ottawa Journal 1972

In 1972 Mr and Mrs Albert Sextone owned what is called the John Shore House in Ashton. It was settled by disbanded soldiers in 1818 and a few other emigrants. Ashton was originally known as Sumner’s Corners after John Sumner who was a leading citizen of the pioneer days. Sumner was also the first miller.

 

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Sumner was instrumental in naming the settlement, and there are two schools of thought regarding the same name. One group says Sumner named Ashton after his ancestral home at Ashton-under-Lyne in England, and the opposing group says it was so named because of his successful pot ashery establishment.

The Historical Atlas of Carleton County of 1879 refers to Ashton as ‘a smart little country village with many encouraging evidence of material prosperity and healthy improvement surrounded by many fair farms and not just a few fine ones’.

When John Shore built the house in 1842 the village had several stores, a blacksmith shop tannery, steam grist and saw mill shingle mill. There were also hotels and a school and several churches.

The house was once owned by the George Jinkinson family who eventually sold it to Peter Levers. Albert Sexstone bought it in 1969 and worked on it weekends until it was advanced enough to live in as the property had deteriorated. On the acre surrounding the property rests the old log cabin originally built by John Shore.

historicalnotes

Blaine CornellThe Jinkinson family operated a garage in Ashton for years probably well into the 60`s

 

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About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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