Just When You Think That You’re in Control!

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For Consideration of the local council– found in the Carleton Place Herald 1897

The other day as a young lady was passing over a sidewalk in she caught her foot in a hole, and was thrown heavily to the ground, sustaining an ugly fracture of her ankle. An action for damages is probable. We mention this merely as a warning to our councilors, for some of the sidewalks here are, to put it mildly, anything but creditable to the town.

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From the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Take for instance Bridge Street. With loose and broken planks it is positively dangerous to walk on at night; and there are other streets in the town to which the same will apply equally as well. There is the long bridge, too. A number of the planks on it are loose. They were taken up when the bridge was being repaired in the spring and were laid down without being nailed.

The intense heat of the past few weeks has warped them them so that they stick up at both ends, and if a pedestrian at one end of the bridge happens to be walking a few paces ahead of one on the opposite side, the one in the rear is liable to be tripped up. Of course we are going to have a new bridge, but in the meantime we doubt if the notices posted on the bridge to the effect that passengers cross at their own risk would relieve the council from liability should an accident occur of that body in keeping the bridge in a good condition until a new one is built.

 

 

Shark Week in Carleton Place on the Mississippi Bridge

Who Caught the Big Shark in Carleton Place?

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

Was the McNeely Bridge Funded on “Drinkin’ Fines”?

 

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From the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Featured Artifact – August 2014

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Old Home Week Souvenir Programme
(1983.2.1)
This booklet, measuring 23x15cm, was created for the Centenary Celebration and Old Home Week of Carleton Place from August 3rd to August 9th, 1924. Although the town had settled in 1819, there were months of planning and preparation for the return of the town’s young and old boys and girls from distant and nearby points. The week began with the ringing of church bells and the sounding of the whistles or bells of the railway shops, of Findlay Brothers foundry and of the Bates & Innes and Hawthorne woollen mills.

The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum loves this Souvenir Programme! It provides us with timeless images of Carleton Place, past Mayors from 1890-1924 and numerous old advertisements for local businesses. It also describes some of the events during that week 90 years ago: such as Decoration Day, baseball games, a Merry-Go-Round, Dog and Pony Shows, street dancing, Fancy Shooting at the Gun Club, and countless more activities.

As the 200th anniversary of the settlement of Carleton Place creeps up on us in 2019, it makes us wonder what our celebrations might look like!

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Central Bridge decorated for the week. Banner behind the arch reads, “Headquarters Old Home Week”.

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Promotional Pin given to attendees of the weeks’ festivities.

 

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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