Dishing up the Memories of The Devlins

Standard

 

shawn

Photo from the Carleton Place Canadian files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

A few weeks ago I posted this inquiry seeking information on the Devlin’s General Store in Black’s Corners. The general store was often the first business in a community and it was a place to meet people and hear the latest news. Devlin’s was a place that people never forgot, nor will they, and hopefully we will get more comments when this piece goes up. We have to begin somewhere.

Lori DevlinMy father-in-law Mervin gave me and his oldest son Jeff the only “talk” I got on the bench outside the store 38 years ago. He sat us both down on the bench after we told him we wanted to get married, and after some unconvincing conversation, he told us,

“Fine, but if you burn your ass you will have to sit on the blisters!”

Jeff and I are still happily married and I miss both my in-laws tremendously. We have so many fond memories of that store, I don’t know where to begin! Actually we could likely write a book about the shenanigans that went on there. I met so many great people at the store and I am looking forward to seeing the memories that are posted.

 

Eleanor Wright--Steven Devlin, owner of Devlin Collision in Almonte  is one of the five sons of Evelyn and Mervin Devlin. The family was one of the most treasured families that grew up in Appleton.
devlin's general store
Mike DakersJezz,i grew up with these guys,and still hang with some of them. Wouldn’t know where to start,and a lot of them i probably shouldn’t share.LOL (AUTHOR’S NOTE– oh pleaseeeeeeeeee share!!)
Corry Turner-PerkinsMy very first puppy came from Merv and Evelyns. My dad came home and said he had a treat from the store for me in his jacket.Merv had told him that I needed a puppy.They were wonderful people. It was always a treat to go visit them.Merv always teased and Evelyn always had a smile.
Lisa Lappi--I loved stopping in there with my Dad. They knew everyone and could talk about anything. A “quick stop” to pick something up could easily turn into an hour long visit. 💕
Shawn DevlinIt was an exciting place to live! lots of friends coming and going. People trying to break in because they didn’t know we lived up stairs Or trying to steal stuff, that usually didn’t go well for them. Crime prevention was dealt with differently in those days.
Derek DevlinI often wonder how my grandparents and their 5 boys lived in that little place! I think it is a good thing there was a grocery store downstairs, dad tells me stories of eating a full pork loin and drinking 3 bags of milk at supper. I also hear they had the best full serve gas service, often leading to 4 teenage boys in a fight over who was going to pump the gas ( I imagine that novelty wore off quickly!) I was very little when they had the store but still have lots of great memories.
Steve Devlin–I am the 2nd oldest son. We were all taught to work hard. Everybody pitched in. Had a lot of great customers. Always an open house for family and friends. The kitchen was the gathering place. I came home one day and there was a bear being skinned on the kitchen table. Another day it could be a deer. Speaking of wildlife we had bantyrooster and chickens in the back yard and an outhouse for our gas customers. Every once in a while we would see a customer running with their pants undone being chased by a rooster.
To sum up my last comment. I want to thank our parents for teaching us the value of a dollar. Teaching us how to respect others, how being friendly is important. Thanks to their teachings and values, my wife and I have owned our own business for over 20 years. It is also a family business, that has employed a brother, sons, cousins, friends, wife etc. I miss them every day. Think of them often. Yours truly Steve Devlin.
Thank  you Steve!
Author’s note- You can’t put your arm around a memory, but you can remember and record it for posterity. Please keep those personal comments coming so we can expand this.

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

5 responses »

  1. I am the 2nd oldest son. We were all taught to work hard. Everybody pitched in. Had a lot of great customers. Always an open house for family and friends. The kitchen was the gathering place. I came home one day and there was a bear being skinned on the kitchen table. Another day it could be a deer. Speaking of wildlife we had bantyrooster and chickens in the back yard and an outhouse for our gas customers. Every once in a while we would see a customer running with their pants undone being chased by a rooster.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. To sum up my last comment. I want to thank our parents for teaching us the value of a dollar. Teaching us how to respect others, how being friendly is important. Thanks to their teachings and values, my wife and I have owned our own business for over 20 years. It is also a family business, that has employed a brother, sons, cousins, friends, wife etc. I miss them every day. Think of them often. Yours truly Steve Devlin.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s