Remembering the Carleton Place CPR Gardens

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gardens

CPR station –Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

People say Tom Mitchell the gardener who took care of the CPR gardens was a kind older man. Not only could this man garden, but he was known as a man with a big smile and a pipe constantly in his mouth . The pipe must have been a permanent fixture because it was said he had a permanent groove in his lower lip. Not much is known about him, but in his later years Tom had a room in the Mississippi Hotel. Tom Mitchell won national awards for the gardens at the Carleton Place CPR station.

Looking for any information you might have– it will be happily recorded.

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historicalnotes

Ted Foote ( Tom Mitchell’s son in law ) was the manager of the LCBO when it was on Bridge Street beside the Carleton Place Canadian office where Coldwell Banker’s offices are now .

Joann Voyce–Tom’s grand daughter Audrey Foote married Ray Simpson and raised a family in Carleton Place. The gardens were the whole area where the Veternarian and Subway now is.The only building on all that piece of land was the actual station. I remember the gardens well.Other than the area directly in front of the station which was paved, the rest was gardens. Even around the water tower where the steam engines filled up, was flower beds. I remember many,many hostas

Sandra Rattray–When I was a child we played inside and outside the station almost daily. Nobody worried about it. I remember it as a huge space where men and women had separate areas. It was kept fairly clean. The baggage department was separate, at one end and Eric Simpson was the Manager of that department. His son, Don Simpson (wife Judy from the C.P. Library) might have pictures. Everyone was very kind to the children, especially one group of children, who had to use the Station washroom because their mother would not allow them in the house. Everyone who knew was disgusted. I actually dated one of the ticket agents and telegraphers for a couple of years. We rode the trains for free.

Llew LloydI’ve commented before about Tom Mitchell and his relationship to my family . My mother and his daughter, Evelyn ( Mitchell ) Foote, were first cousins. Family lore has it that Tommy won first prize for best C.P.R. gardens every second year . He won every second year because the contest rules didn’t allow anyone to win in consecutive years . Evelyn’s daughter Audrey married Ray Simpson who coincidentally ran the gas station across from the RBC before the times of Rupert St. Jean and Earl Horricks. Audrey and Ray’s son Terry is the husband of Margaret Simpson who often comments on your posts .

Tom Mitchell — photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum at the Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlp Reunion.

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

7 responses »

  1. When I was a child we played inside and outside the station almost daily. Nobody worried about it. I remember it as a huge space where men and women had separate areas. It was kept fairly clean. The baggage department was separate, at one end and Eric
    Simpson was the Manager of that department. His son, Don Simpson (wife Judy from the C.P. Library) might have pictures. Everyone was very kind to the children, especially one group of children, who had to use the Station washroom because their mother would not allow them in the house. Everyone who knew was disgusted. I actually dated one of the ticket agents and telegraphers for a couple of years. We rode the trains for free.

  2. I grew up, ages 7 to 12 years old, living in the apartments in the former hotel that is prominent in the first photo. During our youth, we spent a lot of time at the station and not on rare occasions earning the wrath of Mr. Mitchell for climbing the Norway Maples that lined Miguel Street. Mr. Dunphy was in charge of the Express/Baggage as assisted by Mr. Simpson in Express and Joe Hawkins in Baggage. Mr. Raeburn was the Station Master (he lived on Lake Avenue in your current home). Ted Lemaistre worked the telegraph and assisted Mr. Raeburn. Trains ran through Carleton Place beginning at about 2:30 a.m. with the Trans Continental from the West ending the day about 9:30 p.m. with the final Toronto Pool train.

    The Ottawa newspapers arrived in Carleton Place aboard the 4:30 Toronto Pool Train and all the carrier boys congregated in the express area to get their papers for distribution throughout the town. Later Mr. Paul won the contract from the newspaper and delivered the papers to the back of Ernie Foote’s Photography that was on Bridge Street about three doors south of the Queens Hotel

  3. Love the article & comments. Also, check out the other buildings porches etc. & the old building where SRC Music is now, were ‘t we talking about this earlier this year in another article?

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