Sticky and Sweet in Lanark County

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Lanark Maple Syrup Producers— choose one on the map to get some yummy nummies–follow this map

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Photo from Lanark & District Museum

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Looking at the lack of snow in this photo it looks like it could be this year. It is, in fact, the early 1900’s. This picture was taken at George Mather’s Sugar Camp near Middleville, with Elva Mather, George Mather, Evan Craig and Robert Nairn.

 

Come and see early syrup producing artifacts at Thompsontown Maple Products on April 2 & 3 and enjoy the fruits of their labour.-Middleville & District Museum

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Photo from www.chronicallyvintage.com

Here in Canada, where we’re partial to everything from maple bacon to maple glazed salmon, maple (usually maple walnut, to be exact) ice cream to maple flavoured popcorn.

 
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Poto from images.ourontario.ca

William Snow and Family Making Maple Syrup

 

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Photo from digitalflashbacks.wordpress.com

If you’ve been to a sugar shack this season, you’ve seen Maple Syrup in the making. This is how it was done in the early 1900s.

Lanark Maple Syrup Producers— choose one to get some yumy nummies–follow this map

historicalnotes

Almonte Gazette

April 9 1897–Sugar and syrup making have been excellent the past ten days. Large quantities of syrup have been brought into the village for sale from 7oc. to $1 per gallon

Sandy Iwaniw –When I was a kid, we made syrup in a sugar shack just like the one in the picture from the 1900’s. Once the sap was boiling we had to stay up to stoke the wood stove with wood which meant sometimes we were up all night helping dad. We had no hydro at the sugar shack and used kerosene lamps for light. I remember looking forward to this every year even though it felt like hard work for a kid. I loved to lead the work horses back with the vat of sap to the sugar shack.

RELATED READING

Sticky Fingers – With Apologies to Edward Gorey –Wheeler’s Pancake House

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

 

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

2 responses »

  1. When I was a kid, we made syrup in a sugar shack just like the one in the picture from the 1900’s. Once the sap was boiling we had to stay up to stoke the wood stove with wood which meant sometimes we were up all night helping dad. We had no hydro at the sugar shack and used kerosene lamps for light. I remember looking forward to this every year even though it felt like hard work for a kid. I loved to lead the work horses back with the vat of sap to the sugar shack.

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