What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

Standard

It all began innocently enough when the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum posted this.

We recently acquired a group of photographs of this unknown family, taken in 1935. Written on the back of many is “20 Frank Street”. Do you recognize anyone?

Listed at 20 Frank Street in the 1936 directory are Annie and Edwin Armstrong and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Aitkenhead.

12524324_1041167145940179_7899256740890170553_n

Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Thank you to Craig Shouldice

The top picture is Pearl Aitkenhead with her children Marion (right), Mildred (left), and Robert (centre, whose obituary appears here). She was born Pearl Burnside and married Robert Aitkenhead. The Aitkenhead Scotch Bakery in Ottawa was owned by George Aitkenhead, the family patriarch who immigrated from Scotland. Millie was married to Roy Woodcock, and Melville Bowes. Marion married Keith Ardley and had six children.

housefrank

This is now 18 Frank Street- there is no 20- notice the double lot- or were the numbers re-done?

Comments from the CPBHM facebook site

Dan Williams-Here’s my guess. 18 Frank st, where my grandparents lived in the 50’s was a double lot. There was by then no other house there. Maybe there was another house there in 1935 when these pictures were taken but it was destroyed sometime between then and the mid 50’s.

Rick RobertsI lived at 28 Frank Street between 1959-1971. I’m pretty sure that the house in the background, with 2 chimneys, was the home of Clint and Tillie Drader during the 1960s-1970s (Clint died in the early 1960s). Notice the door on the addition to the left…. it led to their kitchen… later a window. The big question is the house beside the people. i strongly suspect that there was a house (probably 20 Frank Street) on what was an empty lot to the south of 28 Frank Street during the 1950s-1960s. In the early 1960s my parents bought a few feet from the north side of that lot to make our driveway wider. At that time the empty lot was owned by the people at 18 Frank Street. In the early 1970s, new 18 Frank street owners built a large addition on the north side of their house to accommodate their upholstery business.

One more recollection… in the mid or early 1900s, sidewalks in Carleton Place had a grid pattern embedded into them where a driveway crossed it. The grids were in about a 12 X 6″ pattern with the 12″side running parallel to the roadway. There was one of those grid patterns in the sidewalk in front of the empty lot where it is possible 20 Frank Street stood earlier.

Synopsis

So to try and get somewhere in this story I acquired the other half of the Aitkenhead pictures at an auction last week. Grand patriarch George Aitkenhead once owned the Aitkenhead Bakery in Ottawa in the late 1800’s- early 1900’s. It was situated on McLaren Street until the great fire of Ottawa/ Hull and then moved to Bank Street. After he moved to his new spot business was not great so he moved out west. More on that later with pictures. His son Robert moved to Carleton Place to 20 Frank Street and Robert Jr. moved to Almonte.

watercp5.jpg

Photo-April 30th 1930- Marion and Mildred Aitkenhead holding young Robbie Aitkenhead at 20 Frank Street at the back of the house.

Remembering a former Carleton Place family- The Aikenheads

Young Robbie, the baby in the above photo worked in the Almonte Bakery and his daughter Millie worked at the Bank of Montreal in Almonte. (Hoping to get all the facts straight as this is what I figured out through pictures, so if anyone knows just dive in there)

Pictures of the family at 20 Frank Street are in another story today, and more pictures of Almonte and the family to come. So what did 20 Frank Street look like? I looked through the archives for fires but found only one. The house was probably torn down as the newspaper article mentions many frame homes on Frank Street. Stay tuned for more.

Update-Craig Shouldice– The Millie Aitkenhead that worked at the BofM in Almonte was Robert Jr’s sister, not his daughter. Robert Jr. has a daughter Millie as well, but she did not work there

PLEASE NOTE-

The photos from the Millie Aikenhead Collection as I call it will be split between the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum (Carleton Place Photos) and the North Lanark Regional Museum (Almonte Photos)

I try and save old photos after I share them with the world as I feel no one will appreciate them if they sit unseen. If you read My Family in a Box story those pictures are now in the save keeping of Archives Lanark.

Are These Memories Just for Ourselves? — The Family in a Box

Related reading:

What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

How to Make a Vintage Apron- Aitkenhead Photo Collection

No Banker Left Behind – Bank of Montreal Almonte Photos

Down by the Mississippi River- Almonte Falls Photos 50s

 

 

historicalnotes.jpg

img (72)

1901- Ottawa Journal- Before the 30s as an example of the quality of the homes in that area. They were frame homes and were either torn down or burned down.

Rick Roberts-–Just to keep things completely confusing… As mentioned in an earlier post, I lived at 28 Frank street 1958-1971. Speaking to my mother about this topic, she says that our house was numbered 6 Frank street when we moved there, and was changed to number 28 sometime in the very early 1960s. With that being the case, under the old numbering system “20 Frank Street’ would have been in the block that is north of John street (closer to the river) on the west side of the street. However, the caption “20 Frank Street” may have been added to the picture at the time the picture was taken, or at a date after the street numbers were changed. Oh, the mystery 🙂

Obituary-Robert S. Aitkenhead

(Past President, Branch 192), (Royal Canadian Legion) in hospital at Almonte, Ontario on Sunday, June 24, 1990, Robert S. Aitkenhead, of Carleton Place, in his 61st year, beloved husband of Elva Horton Southwell; dear father of Larry Aitkenhead of Scarborough, Millie and Robbie Aitkenhead and Candie (Mrs. Brent Hurdis), all of Carleton Place; stepfather of Kenneth Southwell and his wife Jerry of Carleton Place and Bill Southwell of Scarborough. Loving grandfather of 7 grandchildren. Loved son of Mrs. Pearl Aitkenhead of Almonte and the late Robert Aitkenhead. Dear brother of Marion Ardley of Ottawa and Mildred Bowes of Norway Bay. Resting at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, McArthur Avenue, Carleton Place, on Monday  from 7 to 9 p.m. and on Tuesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Service in the chapel on Wednesday at 2 p.m., Reverend Grant Wil­son officiating. Interment St. Mary’s Cemetery.

Elva Aitkenhead

AITKENHEAD, Elva Ann Peacefully in hospital, Ottawa, Ontario on Thursday, June 15th, 2006 at age 70. Elva Ann Horton beloved wife of the late Robert Stephenson Aitkenhead. Dear mother of Ken (Jerry) Southwell, Bill (Danielle) Southwell, Larry (Joy) Aitkenhead, Millie (Donnie) Lee, Robbie (Christina) Aitkenhead, Candy Hurdis and Debbie O’Meara. Dear sister of Rita Julian and Marilyn Ryan both of Almonte. Also survived by several grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her parents Ken and Marguerite Horton and 2 sisters Mary Kennedy, Carol Poag, 3 brothers Hubert, Edward and Warren. Friends may call at the Kerry Funeral Home, 154 Elgin Street, Almonte for visiting on Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. and on Saturday after 9:30 a.m. Thence to Holy Name of Mary Church, Almonte for Mass of Christian Burial on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Interment Holy Name of Mary Parish Cemetery, Almonte.

 

 
1c1               Aitkebhead                                                                     (source LCGA Melanie Mason)
s Pearl ?                                                                                                      Operated a Bakery in Almonte
2 c1 Robert Aitkenhead
   s Pearl ?                                                     -1994                                memotial Ottawa Citizen 7/22/09 by 3 c2
     3 c1 Mildred (Millie) Aitkenhead                                                                          Norway Bay in 1990
        s #1 ? Wilcox                                                                                        Operated a Bakery in Carleton Place
       s #2   Melvin Bowes
     3 c2 Marion Aitkenhead                                                                                      Ottawa in 1990     
         s ? Ardlwy
     3 c3 Robert S. Aitkenhead                 1928-1990        b                 ; d Carleton Place
        s Elva Ann Horton/Southwell        1936-2006         b                 ; d Ottawa
      4 c1 Larry Aitkenhead                                                                                       Scarborough in 1990          
       4 c2 Millie Aitkenhead                                                                                      Carleton Place in 1990
       4 c3 Robbie Aitkenhead                                                                                    Carleton Place in 1990
       4 c4 Candy Aitkenhead                                                                                    Carleton Place in 1990
         s Brent Hurdis
       4 c5 Kenneth Southwell *                                                                                  Carleton Place  in 1990
         s Jerry ?
       4 c6 Bill Southwell*                                                                                           Scarnorough in 1990
                                     * step-children

 

How did a Hurdis get in there? According to Ted Hurdis-Brent is a cousin of Ted’s and Ab and Fran Hurdis’s second born son. He was married to Candy Aitkenhead. Thanks Ted!

 

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

16 responses »

  1. The top picture is Pearl Aitkenhead with her children Marion (right), Mildred (left), and Robert (centre, whose obituary appears here). She was born Pearl Burnside and married Robert Aitkenhead. The bakery in Ottawa was likely owned by David Aitkenhead, the family patriarch who immigrated from Scotland. Millie was married to Roy Woodcock, and Melville Bowes. Marion married Keith Ardley and had six children.

    • Craig…. anytime anyone adds anything it is like finding gold. I will be posting two more one on the Ottawa Bakery and the other on the Almonte one. The North Lanark Museum has no info on anything so this is so great… honouring the families before us.:) THANK YOU

      • The first Aitkenhead to come to Canada was David Aitkenhead, in 1886. He was married to Elizabeth McInnes and had 10 children, 4 of whom died young. Two of his sons were George as mentioned here and Robert, who opened the Aitkenhead bakery in Almonte. I think David was the original owner of the Ottawa bakery. I have a picture somewhere of him standing in front of his delivery van and store. George married Rhoda Donovan, his sister Margaret married Rhoda’s brother John Donovan.

      • Craig I have a few pictures of the Donovans in this box.. keep adding.. thank you.. Its nice to have the history right and intact so people will know in future generations

  2. Just to keep things completely confusing… As mentioned in an earlier post, I lived at 28 Frank street 1958-1971. Speaking to my mother about this topic, she says that our house was numbered 6 Frank street when we moved there, and was changed to number 28 sometime in the very early 1960s. With that being the case, under the old numbering system “20 Frank Street’ would have been in the block that is north of John street (closer to the river) on the west side of the street. However, the caption “20 Frank Street” may have been added to the picture at the time the picture was taken, or at a date after the street numbers were changed. Oh, the mystery 🙂

  3. I love this story. Take a house and tell its story by who lived there! Now it makes it sad that there was no family to keep their photographs. But it’s lovely to see that have been presented with love!

  4. Just a couple of things. George Aitkenhead would have been a patriarch, not a matriarch. The Millie Aitkenhead that worked at the BofM in Almonte was Robert Jr’s sister, not his daughter. Robert Jr. has a daughter Millie as well, but she did not work there.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s