Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

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1882

Since there has been great discussion about St. James Anglican Church I have decided we should all know a little background about the church. Above photo- St. James Thanksgiving 1884

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The Anglican Church in Carleton Place was served for a few years from Franktown– one of the original rectories by Royal patent. In 1883 it was made the centre of a new mission and Rev. E J Boswell was the first missionary. During his incumbency, the first St. James church was built. There were originally unshapely masses of windows and galleries of the early Canadian order of architecture. The unattractive structure was replaced in 1881/1884 with a seating capacity of 500. The following year the debt was paid off. In 1887 there were 256 families and a bible class with 300 names on the roll. Mr Brice McNeeely Jr. (his father owned the tannery)was the superintendent.

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St Mary’s Catholic Church on the other hand was built in two parts with some of the masses held in Lee’s Hotel in 1884. Half of St. Mary’s was built by the local congregation, with even some of the Protestants helping out. They had 75 families and the church seated 400.

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Elliot Hall was named after Canon Elliot. It was built across the street in 1923 on land originally used by the Canada Lumber Co. Across the street is St. James Park which was once home to the other half of the Canada Lumber Co and the proposed site of the Rosamond Woolen Mill. Carleton Place was once going to host the Rosamond Woolen Mills before the owner had a disagreement with an early village council. Angry, he moved his mill lock stock and barrel to Almonte, where in turn, the Penman Mill owners argued with Almonte’s town council, and they moved to Paris, Ontario.The Canada Lumber Co. was torn down in 1908 and a hydro electric dam was built there. The hydro dam was removed in 1973.

St James Anglican Church presently offers twice-weekly Eucharist services, weekly youth group and Bible studies, several women’s groups, a variety of youth activities, a choir, and an ever-expanding Outreach program to help the less fortunate in other parts of the world. Father David was once at the helm— and, if don’t know who he is by now–you can read about him here.

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Father D just retired last year-photo by Linda Seccaspina

 

Guide to Church Services in 1870 in Carleton Place:

St. James’ (Church of England) – ½ past 10 o’clock a.m. on each alternate Sabbath, and at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on the other Sabbath.  St. Andrew’s  (Church of Scotland) – 11 o’clock a.m. every Sabbath.  Zion Church (Canada Presbyterian) – ½ 2 o’clock p.m. every Sabbath.  Reform Presbyterian – 11 o’clock a.m., and 3 o’clock p.m., on alternate Sabbaths.  Wesleyan Methodist – ½ past 10 o’clock on alternate Sabbaths, and ½ past 6 o’clock on the other Sabbath.  Baptist – ½ past 2 o’clock every Sabbath.  Roman Catholic – occasionally, of which notice will be given.

Photos- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum and Linda Seccaspina

 

 

Related Reading:

Imagine if All the People…. Photos of Father David Andrew’s Retirement Party

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

Father David Andrew – Just Call Me Father D!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

One of my favourite songs

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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