Does Carleton Place Have the Number 1 Small Town Song?

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So which town is favoured with the number 1 small Ontario town song?

Is it from my local favourite Brock Zeman?

We drink at the Bridge the Works, and the Moose and the Queens,

Where the women are—–lovely.

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How about Stompin Tom?

Who can’t pass the turnoff to nearby Carleton Place without thinking that’s the town where, so Tom told us, they believe local bodies of water were formed by sweat dripping off the face of Big Joe Mufferaw.

And they say Big Joe used to get real wet
From cutting down timber and working up a sweat
And everyone will tell you around Carlton Place
The Mississippi dripped onto Big Joe’s face

Pat Labron and Marilyn Lukas came up with a song.

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carleton

By Pat Labron & The Carleton Place Singers
ALBUM: The Carlton Place Song- 1985
LABEL: Summit Sound
CATALOGUE #: SR 116

song

 

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Three great women of Carleton Place– Marilyn Lukas, Mayor Melba Barker and singer of the Carleton Place song Pat Labron. Who was the gentleman in this photo? Thanks Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum for sending.

 

Canada’s small towns have produced some of the world’s most talented musicians, so it’s only fitting that rural roots have been the inspiration for a host of hit songs. What is the number one town song in Ontario? Sadly not one of ours. Neil Young has claimed he’s talking about a few small towns, the main one he’s referring to is Omemee, Ontario, northwest of Peterborough. It was his hometown as a child and is now home to the Youngtown Rock and Roll Museum.

Pat Lebron pictures and music from The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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