The Pickle Jar of Quilts

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As I felt the quilts in Wisteria in Carleton Place I remembered. Memories of quilts being made and given with love were the norm in my childhood,  and each quilt in our family had a memory.

Seven days after my birth I was placed in a quilt my grandmother had made and brought immediately to her home as my mother was ill. I was tucked into my crib with the same quilt I came home from the hospital in.

One night my father gathered me up in that same quilt and smuggled me into the Royal Victoria Hospital hoping my mother might remember me as she had postpartum depression. I can still see her looking down at the cards she was playing solitaire with while I was holding on to the edge of that dear quilt in fear. To this day I will never forget that image – my father says I was barely two,  but I still remember the grayness of the room. While my life was sterile and cold, the quilt held warmth and security. My grandmother always said that blankets wrap you in warmth but quilts wrap you in love.

At age 12 my mother died, and my grandmother sat with me on her veranda and wrapped that same quilt around me while I cried. Life was never the same after that, and the quilt was placed on my bed like an old friend when I stayed with her.  I would stare at the painting on the wall while I tried to sleep and thought that a lot of people understood art but not quilts. If I had a lot of money I would own a quilt and not a piece of art,  because in the end which gives you the most comfort?

When I got married at age 21,  my Grandmother sat at the dining room table for weeks and worked on a quilt for my new home. As I traveled down the road of life the quilt was always there while people came and went. Although it was aging gracefully it was still heavy and secure anytime I needed it. Through death and sickness it held comfort, and the promise that it would never desert me. This quilt held my life with all the bits and pieces, joys and sorrows, that had been stitched into it with love.

At age 47 the quilt died peacefully in my arms. A terrible house fire had destroyed it, and as I looked at the charred edges I realized the thread that held it together had bound the both of us forever. Now it was time to go down the final road by myself,  and remembering the words of Herman Hesse I began the journey.

“Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.”

Shopping information: All these beautiful quilts come from:

Wisteria: ‘a little of this.. a little of that. and a whole lot of …

Wisteria

 62 Bridge Street,

 Carleton Place, Ontario

 K7C 2V3

 613-253-8097

Email: info@wisteriacp.com

The PickleDish Quilt Shop on Bridge Street
Quilters Poker Run 
Visitors will “Hop and Shop” 
in Downtown Carleton Place.
The PickleDish Quilt Shop located at 113 Bridge Street is part of a Quilters Poker Run “Shop Hop”. This is an annual event and will be held between March 20st and April 4th. It is expected over the event period that 100 or more woman from the following communities of Navan, Chesterville, Hawkesbury, Kemptville, Perth, Orleans, Rideau Ferry, Nepean, Arnprior, Vankleek Hill, Brockville, Almonte, Richmond, Kanata, and Ottawa will travel to downtown Carleton Place.
'Welcome Quilters from all over to our Downtown this Friday!The PickleDish Quilt Shop on Bridge StreetQuilters Poker Run Visitors will “Hop and Shop” in Downtown Carleton Place. The PickleDish Quilt Shop located at 113 Bridge Street is part of a Quilters Poker Run “Shop Hop”.  This is an annual event and will be held between March 20st and April 4th.   It is expected over the event period that 100 or more woman from the following communities of Navan, Chesterville, Hawkesbury, Kemptville, Perth, Orleans, Rideau Ferry, Nepean, Arnprior, Vankleek Hill, Brockville, Almonte, Richmond, Kanata, and Ottawa will travel to downtown Carleton Place.'

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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